lilac
Syringa Vulgaris

Lilacs perform best in full sun. At least six hours of sunshine per day is optimum in the mountains and elsewhere in Zone 6 and cooler where lilacs are most often grown. Lilacs seem to best grown in the mountains of the Carolinas where it is a bit cooler. Most varieties bloom just a short time if it is a hot spring. Lilacs bloom on old wood, so prune in the spring right after they bloom. If you prune later in the summer, you may be removing the wood. Lilac flower clusters are getting smaller, may be time to prune.

lilac

Pruning is necessary for continued healthy growth and flowering in North Carolina where we often have a much longer growing season than elsewhere where people may have grown lilacs. Remove 1/4 to 1/3 of the largest stems each winter and do not allow more than 6 to 12 major stems to remain. Stems should be spaced so that they do not rub. In addition to removing the older, larger stems remove all but one or two replacement suckers an inch or so below the ground following flowering and remove all small twiggy growth annually (easiest in winter). Damaged and diseased wood should be removed as soon as it is noticed. If you have a friend with a shrub you admire ask for a start. Lilacs are very easy to propagate by cuttings or simply laying a branch to the ground and covering with soil.

How much Sun?
At least six hours of sunshine per day is optimum in the mountains and elsewhere in Zone 6 and cooler where lilacs are most often grown.



Season of Bloom
Spring/summer
Height
5-15 feet tall.
Hardiness USDA
Hardiness Zone 3-7
Flower Color
blue, lavender, pink, red, purple, yellow, and white, depending on the variety.
Exposure
Full sun to partial shade
Propagation
grafting, layering, soft wood cuttings.
Pests
  • Prone to attack by slugs and snails.
  • Powder white mildew may appear after a summer of hot, humid weather.
  • Lilac Borers